FunStuff

We went to check out the 41st Annual Scarecrow Festival in this historic town just East of Brenham.  Chamber of Commerce Website information:  

The Festival boasts more than 250 juried exhibitors (home décor, gardening, artists, craftsmen, jewelry, clothing, etc.), delicious country-style food, live entertainment and music, and tours of the historic community.  A special Children’s Activity Corner provides pony rides, a petting zoo, face painting, barrel train and more.

Which indicated there would be a lot of people.  But I was expecting a lot of scarecrows too.  They were not as numerous as I had hoped for.  Here is a small taste of the scarecrow festival through the lens of my camera.

 

Store built 1878 by a German settler, W. Reinstein, later became a bank.

The Old Rock Store constructed in 1869.

Modern day post office had a nice postal scarecrow.

Most of the scarecrows were like this one.  Just wooden sticks with clothes and a face.

This was a nice one.

Gazebo next to the public library.

A combination of witch and scarecrow.

A scarecrow couple hanging out in front a place where you could buy beer.

A balcony scarecrow

A witch scarecrow

A couple of kid scarecrows resting under a tree.

 

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We braved the Austin traffic on a Saturday afternoon to visit this sculpture garden.  The sculpture pictures are in no particular order, as we wandered around going first one way then another.  These are just the sculptures I liked, not all of them by any means.

There isn’t an admission charged – its free.
Tuesday – Friday 10 AM – 4 PM

Saturday – Sunday  Noon – 4 PM
Monday – Closed

The three Muses are larger than life size figures on the lawn in front of the parking area of the sculpture garden. The Greek muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, preside over arts and sciences. Stylistically, their poses and clothing are classically inspired, creating elegant, timeless, inspirational figures.

These cast stone figures of Mother and Child and Father and Son
where done in 1962. They are also in the parking area.  They are on loan from the San Antonio Museum of Art.

Inside near the Museum Entrance (there is an admission charged to go into the museum) is this 1/3 replica of Hope of Humanity. The full size statue is in Herman Park in Houston, TX.

At the end of the patio is Winged Man done in 1959. This is also a small replica. The full size statue is at Love Field in Dallas.

Leaving the patio we wandered around the garden. We also climbed the stairs, but there are no sculptures up there.

Wild Boar – 1979

St. Francis with birds – 1972

Nun – 1972

Mother and Child – 1960

Torchbearers – 1961

Mother and Child – 1972

Family – 1960

Skater – 1970

Icarus – 1965

Bambino su Cuscino – 1976

Entrance to Jerusalem – 1953

John the Baptist – 1957

Come unto me – 1976

This piece is by Damian Priour – “Pointed Sphere” – 2005

Lucifer

After doing a volksmarch in San Marcos we decided to stop in Kyle for some sightseeing.  We parked at the old depot and walked around.

Kyle’s MoPac depot which was undergoing renovations now has a sign that it is “Now Open”.

Just down from the depot a nice red, white and blue water tower looks down on the Kyle Police Department.

There is an old baggage cart on the depot platform.

There is a hand car on display also.

MoPac caboose 854 also sets on display near the old depot.

We left the caboose and headed toward the Market Days activities in the park.

The new 2006 city hall building is home to Kyle’s only elevator.

Live Oak Masonic Lodge #304 has met at this location for over a hundred years.

There is a very large slice of cherry pie above the entrance to Texas Pie Company.

Given by Mr. and Mrs. Ashley Bunton in memory of John Wheeler Bunton, this tower houses the Episcopal Church Bell from the 1880s.

The former city hall building, located in the town square, was built in the Revival style architecture style during 1912.

This fountain is in the center of Mary Kyle Hartson Park where the Kyle Market Days were going on.

A beautiful hexagon gazebo sets in one corner of the park where some musicians were setting up.

Returning to our car at the depot we got another view of the new City Hall.

Just across from the depot is the VFW Hall.

We drove over to see a hundred year old church and the WPA school buildings.

Reverend Tom Garrett was pastor of the Methodist congregation when it was organized in 1880, the same year the city was established when David E. Moore and Fergus Kyle deeded 200 acres for a townsite to the International-Great Northern Railroad.

Plaque #191 on the Methodist Church Historic locations list.

A Texas Historical Marker on this building near the corner of Nance and Austin Streets states in part that through the Works Progress Administration (WPA), a New Deal agency active during the Great Depression, the U.S. Government paid for about three-fourths of the cost while Kyle voters approved a bond issue in February 1935 to fund the remainder. Work on the project began in January 1936, giving jobs to 29 men.

The WPA buildings at the Kyle campus, crafted by local labor and built of locally quarried limestone, have served since their construction as educational facilities and social centers.

We thought we were through with our Kyle sightseeing and headed back to get on I-35, when we spotted this.

A large mural on the back of building next to the railroad tracks.

A new bar with music and dance floor, named the “Railhouse”, will be opening Oct. 2017  in Kyle.   One of the owners gave us a tour when we asked about the mural on the back of the building.

This mural is to left of entrance.

On an inside wall is this mural of Janis Joplin.

When you go out the back door there is this mural of Willie Nelson to the right.

On the opposite side of the back entrance is this mural of Johnny Cash.

All of these murals are by the same man, Gary Holman. I give his artwork 5 stars! I want to thank our tour guide for taking time out of his schedule to give us this impromptitude tour.

I’ve visited Fort Hood, but never nearby Killeen.  I heard they had a new mural, so we decided to visit, we wandered around town and found other things. The pictures are in the order I took them, probably not the most efficient way to go. 

We passed this nice Masonic Lodge Building before reaching the mural.

Right end of the Mural

Center of the Mural

Left End of the Mural

When we were leaving we notice this ghost sign on a building across the street. I think old signs are interesting, don’t you.

The 1913 Santa Fe Depot is now the Chamber of Commerce building. They told us about some things to go visit.

They recommended the “Fort Hood November 5 Memorial” for the 13 people killed and 32 wounded, so we went over to visit.

Each of the 13 individual markers has a sculpture on top. This one of Scooby Doo was on Francheska Velez’s. She was pregnant so the terrorist actually killed 14 people.

Across the street was another memorial so we walked over to take a look. It is a very nice Korean War Memorial.

I had the address for the city hall so we drove over to take a look. Turns out it has separate entrances for the boys and girls, LOL

The 1928 High School Building has been repurposed into City Hall.

Boy’s Entrance

Girls Entrance

We next headed over to the Central Texas University Campus to look around. We stopped at the bell tower first.

Bell Tower

Fountain in the pond between the library and the bell tower.

Nice arched bridge over the pond.

Located in front of the library (side opposite the pond) is an LBJ Memorial.

Neat Presidential Seal.

LBJ was president when Central Texas College was created. He spoke at the dedication ceremony.

Fountain near LBJ Memorial isn’t working.

We left the campus to look for Power Sports because the Chamber of Commerce told us they have a mural there too.

On the way we spotted this mural on the side of Extraco Bank.

First of three murals on the side of Power Sports. Looks like Elvis to me.

Center Mural.

Last Mural.

We had one last place to visit in Killeen – The Central Texas Veteran’s Cemetery. I should have realized it would be huge.  We parked at the office and walked the pathway lined with memorials.

Central Texas Veteran’s Cemetery.

Iraq/Afghanastan Memorial

New Vietnam Memorial – dedication will be on 8-28-17.

Back of the Mural.

Other side of the back.

Reminds me of Arlington Cemetery.

All of the works of art in this sculpture garden were made from little toys.  We found out about this on Roadside America.  Terry “Tunes” Parks is a friendly fellow who’s filling his yard with large sculptures -a big cow skull, a Tiki head, and a 10-foot-long banana.  Sure enough he came out to tell us about his art.  Here is some of his art.

My sister found a list of murals in Waco, some we’d seen, some we hadn’t so we set out to hunt them all down and take pictures. I’m not going to waste any time letting you know which ones I liked the best. They were the ones on the Lazy Fisherman (a closed restaurant in East Waco). They were done by native Wacoan Ira Watkins back in 2001. They cover both sides of the building, and one section has been vandalized, but it is still a great display of talent. I hope the building gets bought and put back to use and the people preserve these great murals.

Nearby is another one I like, it used to be bigger, but someone has peeled away the plaster from the brick destroying part of the mural.

A couple of the murals I’ve never really considered to be murals because they are the names of a business, but they were on the list so here they are.

The goodwill murals are nice too.

Some of the murals have a religious theme.

One is a replica of a famous painting.

On the side of the East Waco Library is a collage.

Some were ethnic.

And some are “abstract” which means I have no idea what they are.  I appreciate that they are better than a blank wall, but I don’t really like them.

After doing the volksmarch at Singing Wind Park we did some sightseeing. Our first stop was at the Museum of Western Art where two sculptures are on display out front.

“Out of the Mystic Past” by Fritz White is of a Native American shaman.

“Wind & Rain” by William Moyers is of a cowboy and his horse.

Leaving the museum we headed into town for an assortment of sights.

“Lupe” by artist GiGi Miller, is a mosaic Gudalupe Bass located in Louise Hays Park.

A very nice mural on the wall of the McDonald’s.

Mural on the top floor of the public library.

Mosiac mural is on the outside wall of the library. Can you name the books the scenes are taken from?

Opened in 1926, the Arcadia now sits unused.

Masonic Building occupied by Kerrville Lodge No. 697 A.F. & A.M., from 1891 until 1927.

A former post office, this art deco building was constructed with federal Treasury Department funds in 1935. It is now Kerr Arts & Cultural Center.

“Mother’s Love” an abstract design by James Avery.

Clock tower is one end of a skybridge over HWY 16 for City Hall employees to reach the parking garage. City Hall complete with clock tower and skybridge opened in 2012.

1936 County Marker in front of the courthouse.

Lehmann Memorial Gazebo on the courthouse lawn.

In loving memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice and in honor of all who served.

Snail sculpture near the entrance to Kerr Arts & Cultural Center

One side of a carving in the Kerr Arts & Cultural Center

The other side of the same carving.

A general store started in 1869 by Mr. Schreiner and a partner. This building was erected in 1919.

The 1915 Southern Pacific brick depot has been made into a restaurant.

Before we left Kerrville we headed over to “The Coming King, Sculpture and Prayer Garden”. After our GPS sent us to the wrong place we found the entrance. If you want to vist the correct entrance location is 30.071197, -99.115820. Keep right to reach parking area.